The Power & Wonder of Revision

By Leah Henderson, Writing for Children & Young Adults, Spalding School of Writing Faculty

On any given day, I hear or read a new article, blog post, or craft chapter offering up what an author believes to be the “best writing advice.” It feels as if everyone thinks they have the answers, but of course most of the answers are different. And you know what, that’s okay, because no two writers are alike. We each have distinct ways of writing, seeing, and interpreting the world around us. Therefore, it makes perfect sense that we’d each have different approaches for creating stories.

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The Intricacies of Time in Story

By Edie Hemingway, Writing for Children & Young Adult Faculty

As we enter not only a new year, but a new decade, I find myself thinking a lot about time. How unsettled these times are. How fast it flies by. And what does the future hold? When I looked for a simple definition of time, this was the first of many I came across: “the indefinite continued progress of existence and events in the past, present, and future regarded as a whole.”  An endless progression!

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Productivity: Finding Time to Make Time

By Nancy McCabe, Spalding School of Writing Creative Nonfiction and Fiction Faculty

Toronto. A busy life on Bloor Street.

For years, as a single parent with simultaneous full-time and part-time jobs, I was always on a tight schedule, determined to set aside an hour or two each day to write. Then, a couple of years ago, my daughter went off to college. With fewer errands to run and meals to cook and needs to attend to, after years of highly structured schedules and extreme discipline, I was ready to take a more relaxed approach to my work. But my luxurious illusion of unlimited time was just that—an illusion—and I’m still struggling to settle into a new writing routine.  

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Summer Residency in Paris: The Rest of the Details!

By Katy Yocom, Spalding School of Writing Associate Director for Communications and Alumni Relations

Last week, I wrote up all the details we could announce about our Paris residency, July 6-16, 2020. This week I’m back with final details, including travel costs and an innovative new workshop focused on professional writing.

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Summer Residency in Paris: (Most of) The Details You’ve Been Waiting For

By Katy Yocom, Spalding School of Writing Associate Director of Communications and Alumni Relations

This is the time of year when students and alums start sending me GIFs of impatient cats, with captions like “Me watching my email for news about Paris.”

I know you’re eager to make your plans. I swear we’re not holding out on you; we’re just putting the final touches on the residency. And in that spirit, even though final details are still in progress, here’s what I can tell you.

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Ohm’s Law

By Debra Kang Dean, Spalding School of Writing Poetry Faculty

For any circuit the electrical current is directly proportional to the voltage and is inversely proportional to the resistance.

As a consequence of my bewilderingly high scores in the electronics section of the battery of tests I had to take before enlisting in the Air Force, I was recruited into the field of ground radio repair. It turned out to be a poor match since I never really got beyond being able to read schematics; I console myself by believing that one need also have mechanical sense to do well, and my scores on that part of the test had been dismal.

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The Way We Live Now

By Robin Lippincott, Spalding School of Writing Fiction & Creative Nonfiction Faculty

One of the benches overlooking Spy Pond, Arlington.

Here is my third attempt at writing this blog post, which gives you some context for what follows. The first two efforts were completely different and unrelated, on subjects having nothing to do with this one. Finally, I realized there was really only one thing I wanted to write about here; it was so obvious that I’d missed it entirely.

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Life of a Writer: Autumn Edition

EXCITING NEWS & UPDATES FROM STUDENTS, ALUMNI, FACULTY & STAFF!

STUDENTS

Jason Cooper (PW) launched his new theatre company, The Chicken Coop, on September 27th here in Louisville, Kentucky. More than just a theatre company, The Chicken Coop strives to provide a variety of entertainment offerings and to create a place for artists and audiences to come together to celebrate, be inspired and simply have a great time.

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Announcing the Full Line-up of Spalding’s Festival of Contemporary Writing, Nov. 16-22

Spalding University’s Festival of Contemporary Writing, the state’s largest fall-spring reading series, takes place Saturday, November 16, through Friday, November 22, with faculty and alumni of the low-residency programs of Spalding’s School of Creative and Professional Writing. Bestselling graphic novelist Gene Luen Yang headlines the festival as Distinguished Visiting Writer. Yang is the author of the Printz Award-winning American Born Chinese and the National Book Award Finalist Boxers & Saints, a boxed set of graphic novels. Yang has served as a National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and is the recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship.

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Fractured Fiction

By Eleanor Morse, Spalding School of Writing Fiction Faculty

Ocean Vuong, a soft-spoken and brilliant Vietnamese-American poet and fiction writer and a 2019 recipient of a MacArthur fellowship, said, “Often we demand of the American novel to be cohesive, a monolithic statement of a generation, but having grown up post-911, cohesion was not part of my generation’s imagination, nor our language, nor our self-identity, and I felt if I were to write my version of an American novel, it would have to look more like fragmentation. 

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